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Fans color the streets red as they gather for the parade. Crimson // Jesse Villaverde

The Washington Nationals won the World Series for the first time in their franchise’s history on Wednesday, Oct. 30.

In the following days, a parade and rally were held in Washington, D.C., to honor and celebrate their World Series win.

The city was packed with fans waiting for the celebration of the team’s World Series title to occur. Streets were closed to escort the parade and lead them to the Capitol.

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A young Nationals fan gets a front-row seat to the celebration. Crimson // Jesse Villaverde

Fans flooded the sidewalks, cheering for their team. Young children were climbing up trees to get a better view of the parade.

David Milan grew up in Washington and has been a fan since 2005, the same year the Nationals were established.

“I grew up watching the Nationals,” Milan said. “They have not had a lot of luck in their time being in the league. Seeing them win it all was one of the best moments in my life.”

Milan’s girlfriend, Carly O’Neill, has recently become a Nationals fan since they started dating.

“He was on the floor and just so happy after they won,” O’Neill said. “It was a moment he will not forget and it was amazing to see him happy.”

This was the team’s first ever World Series appearance, playing inside Minute Maid Park, where they beat the Houston Astros in a best of seven game series.

The Washington natives were the underdogs in the playoffs, being the last seed in the National League bracket.

According to CBS Sports, the Nationals began their season with a record of 19 wins and 31 losses.

“It was a tough time for me as a fan,” Milan said. “However, I still stood by the Nationals and hoped they could find a way to play better.”

The Nationals, who used to train in Viera, Florida during the spring, would go on to have a record of 74 wins and 39 losses for the rest of the year.

This earned them a spot in the one game elimination wild card game round.

The Nationals now share their current complex with the Houston Astros—the team they beat in the World Series.

“It was shocking, but I believed they would finish strong,” Milan said. “They were fun to watch. Without them, I would not be here. I am excited to be in this environment and celebrate their championship.”

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Jumbotrons displayed the Nationals team throughout the capital streets. Crimson // Kevin Boodoosingh

O’Neill also discussed her first experience watching the Nationals.

“It was really exciting,” O’Neill said. “They reminded me of the team from the movie ‘Moneyball,’ when no one expected the team to win.”

The crowds cheered the loudest when the first-ever draft pick in 2005, Ryan Zimmerman, held up the World Series trophy from the bus.

Zimmerman, a longtime third baseman and first baseman, has been with the Nationals for 15 years.

“Seeing Ryan hold up the trophy was my favorite part because he has played for so long for the Nationals, and now he has his moment,” Joanne Lowry said. Lowry, a fan of the team, is from Harrisburg, Virginia, where the Nationals minor league team is located.

She has seen Zimmerman play since he was first drafted in 2005.

“To see him play for as long as he has, I am happy for him to finally win,” Lowry said. “He has been my favorite player since the Nationals became a team.”

Lowry spoke about what this parade meant to Washington.

“It is exciting, and memorable,” Lowry said. “I am happy to see people come together and be happy to celebrate a moment like this. The city binds together, it means so much to D.C.”

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